A date for your diary fellow Collectors – John Peel’s Record Collection Online & Interactive

Music legend John Peel’s record collection, one of the most celebrated in the world, is being made into an interactive online museum for the public.

His family have given exclusive access to the collection which includes 25,000 LPs, 40,000 singles and many thousands of CDs.

John Peel’s wife and Patron of the John Peel Centre for Creative Arts, Sheila Ravenscroft, introduces John Peel’s Record collection and explains how it was catalogued and how it is going to be made available on The Space, together with other material.

Click here to take a tour around John Peel’s virtual record collection

Click here to view 'A' – the first 100 albums filed under the letter A in John's collection. Letter B follows on 8th May, C on the 15th May and so on until October 2012.

 

Courtesy of Jeff Klingman at The L Magazine:-

10 Things We Learned From John Peel's Online Record Collection

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Today is the day that the English Arts Council's The Space website began putting the historically epic record collection of late BBC DJ John Peel online for everyone to peruse. Slowly doled out from now until October, they will be putting up the first 100 records he'd filed under each letter of his alphabetical collection, with scanned album artwork, Peel's personal file cards, and links to streaming music where available. Given that the entire collection includes over 25,000 vinyl LPs, 40,000 singles, and thousands of (presumably cracked-to-shit) CD jewel cases, this truncated taste is understandable. But even with only "A" available, and lots of supplementary goodies already embedded, we have already killed a frightening amount of time on it this morning and afternoon. Some initial impressions…
This project is being carried out with the utmost integrity and respect.

From the heartfelt video intro by Peel's widow Shelia Ravencroft to the web design emulating the shelf-browsing experience of every socially awkward record nerd at every party ever to the clickable front and back cover materials for each featured entry, every detail of this archiving is really top notch.

The scope of this collection is pretty mind-boggling. (No doi.)

100 records into the "A" section only gets us to Adam Ant!

The first 100 records of each letter limit is going to be kind of a bummer throughout the length of this project.

100 records into "A," and seriously, we're only at Adam Ant. How will I ever find out which Monochrome Set records he had???? While we understand and appreciate the time and care taken in digitizing just a fraction of these materials, we are human, and we can't help hungering for more. Maybe just in text form?

He was way more meticulously organized than you are.

iTunes does the majority of work alphabetizing and cross-referencing for most of you, but even those with vinyl collections outstripping the space available for them in a New York City apartment (you reach this limit within your first six months of record collecting, give or take) are probably not going to the trouble of hand-typing individual note cards to create a Dewey decimal for your discs, like Peel did. Alphabetical, sure. Cross referenced with a distinct catalog number? Bullshit. Prove it.

Read the rest of the article here.

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